leonardo - Inconsolata-g font derived from Inconsolata and Inconsolata-dz
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Subject:Inconsolata-g font derived from Inconsolata and Inconsolata-dz
Time:01:26 pm
I use the free Inconsolata font (by Raph Levien) to program and as shell font, and I like it a lot. I have seen this blog post: "Adding straight single and double quotes to Inconsolata", that offers Inconsolata-dz:
http://nodnod.net/2009/feb/12/adding-straight-single-and-double-quotes-inconsola/

So I've uses FontForge to modify more his Inconsolata version, to fix some of the things I don't like of Inconsolata. This is the result, my Inconsolata-g:


Here you can download the font (ask if you want a ttf version too):
http://www.fantascienza.net/leonardo/ar/inconsolatag/inconsolata-g_font.zip

My changes:
- Single and double quotes ' and " are now straight, this comes from Inconsolata-dz.
- , . ' are a bit more visible/thick, because such symbols are really important in C-like languages, and you need to see them well. (Now the comma of , is a bit bigger than the comma of ; but I don't care of such useless symmetries, I use this font for practical purposes).
- The ^ is a bit wider, because it's used often enough in C-like languages, as bitwise operator, and it deserves to be more visible.
- The curved upper leg of the lower case r is a bit more visible, it was a bit too much thin before. This is a small change.
- In the latest version of Inconsolata the zero digit is slashed, this is quite positive and helps tell it apart from upper case O. But if you have many zeros in a row 00000000 such slashes produce a "vibrating grating" for the eye, that I don't like. So I've replaced the slash with a small point. I use such font is large enough size, so the point is very little. If you use such Inconsolata-g as a very small font such tiny point becomes almost invisible. This is the first time I use FontForge and I don't know yet how to add size hints to fonts.
- Numbers are a bit larger (keeping the font non proportional), so I can read them a bit better. This has the disadvantage that zero is now almost as wide as uppercase O, so the little point of the zero is important.
- The symbol minus - is a bit lower, so it's a bit better aligned when I use a smile :-), this has the disadvantage that the horizontal lines of - and + aren't fully aligned any more.
- [] are now about as tall as () and {}, so Python collection literals have a more uniform look.
- In future I may make the upper side of ! flat and make the lower case t more straight, but in practical situations this doesn't bother me, so I have left them as they are for now.
- The font is bigger than Inconsolata, this comes from the Inconsolata-dz, I don't like this, but it doesn't bother me much, so I've not changed it.

There's another important thing I'd like to change: to keep the bold chars of Inconsolata-g as wide as the non bold versions, because I'd like to keep them non proportional when a computer programming editor shows keywords as bold. I don't know yet how to do this with FontForge (I accept suggestions).
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(Anonymous)
Subject:ProggySquare
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-02-13 01:37 pm (UTC)
My favorite monospaced font is called "ProggySquare Slashed Zero" and is available from www.proggyfonts.com

I used it for nearly everything and it's far better than any monospaced font I ever used before, check it out. And it's pretty small, so you've got tons of lines on your screen
(Reply) (Thread)


leonardo_m
Subject:Re: ProggySquare
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-02-13 03:35 pm (UTC)
I like to program with a bigger font (the size you can see in that image, but with a grey background), because I use languages like Python and D, that don't require huge amount of code like Java. Showing less code on the screen is better, because it allows me to see bugs better and forces me to not write too much code into a single function or too much long lines.
And I like my fonts to be well anti-aliased, to avoid some high-frequency noise. So for me the font you have suggested is much worse than this Inconsolata-g.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

lightstatic
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-02-13 01:58 pm (UTC)
It was the first time I used Font Forge, so I'm not entirely sure how the font got bigger -- if you want to fix it, feel free :) -- dz
(Reply) (Thread)

(Anonymous)
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-02-13 06:31 pm (UTC)
Thanks, I like inconsolata, and I like this too :)
I've created a package for ArchLinux, hope more people can use it.
(Reply) (Thread)

(Anonymous)
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-06-27 02:38 pm (UTC)
To keep the width of bold characters the same you would have to simply make a bold version of the whole font whose characters would have the same width as the regular version. I think there is no other way.
(Reply) (Thread)


leonardo_m
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-06-27 06:09 pm (UTC)
Are then Windows/Ubuntu able to find by themselves the right font file to load to show the bold text?
Are there ways to partially automatize the creation of the bold version? Editing all chars by hand requires days of work or more, and the text ditors are already able to create a rough bold version.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

(Anonymous)
Subject:TTF
Link:(Link)
Time:2009-10-13 05:21 pm (UTC)
I am stuck on a Windows laptop at work and can't load the OTF version of the font included in the zip file. I can load the TTF version but this one has an error where the [] do not line up as they do in the image above. Could you please either fix the OTF file so that it works in windows or correct the TTF file?
(Reply) (Thread)


flipzagging
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-05-19 04:54 pm (UTC)
Thanks for this. I used to use Inconsolata but this is a distinct improvement.
(Reply) (Thread)

leonardo_m
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-05-19 06:14 pm (UTC)
You are welcome. Eventually I'd like to create the bold (with same width) version too, because often IDEs need bold fonts too.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

(Anonymous)
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-09-17 09:21 pm (UTC)
over here it looks as if your "zero with a dot" glyph's kerning has slipped too much towards the 9 (if you compare with inconsolata)

I just tried to fix myself, but fontforge and english font-speak glossary has a quite steep leraning curve.
(Reply) (Thread)

leonardo_m
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-09-17 09:38 pm (UTC)
> over here it looks as if your "zero with a dot" glyph's kerning has slipped too much towards the 9 (if you compare with inconsolata)

Sorry, I am ignorant about such matters, and I don't understand what you mean.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

(Anonymous)
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-10-08 02:22 am (UTC)
He means that the 0 is to the left of center, causing there to be too little whitespace on the left, and too much whitespace on the right.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

leonardo_m
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-10-08 10:21 am (UTC)
Oh, I see now. Thank you. Maybe it's worth fixing.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

(Anonymous)
Link:(Link)
Time:2013-01-30 08:24 pm (UTC)
Was the dotted zero kerning ever fixed?
(Reply) (Thread)

(Anonymous)
Link:(Link)
Time:2013-08-04 12:08 pm (UTC)
i compared it with Consolas font and i realized İnconsolata is very pale Consolas is darker can you make it darker?
(Reply) (Thread)

leonardo_m
Link:(Link)
Time:2013-08-04 12:34 pm (UTC)
For me Consolas is too much dark.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

leonardo - Inconsolata-g font derived from Inconsolata and Inconsolata-dz
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